This Is Why The Galaxy Note 7 Has Been Catching Fire

Galaxy Note 7 has been recently recalled because they have been catching fire. It’s definitely not the first phone to catch fire, but a giant exodus of recalling phones has not happened since 2009 when Nokia had to recall 46 million phones. Exploding phones can cause major damage to users and can also probably burn a face or two.

Why Galaxy Note 7 Was Burned Up

Even the DGCA banned flyers from carrying the Note 7 in Indian flights. In fact, the captain of my flight announced that the phone should not be turned on in any circumstances. That’s when I realised Samsung is having a PR nightmare.  In fact, Even iPhone users faced this issue when a biker recently got burnt by his iPhone.

Why Galaxy Note 7 Was Burned Up

Why Does It Happen?

According to a Samsung official, the Note 7 defect is minuscule and only affects 0.01 percent of all Note 7 handsets that were manufactured. “It is a very rare manufacturing process error,” according to the official.

The frequency at which Samsung phones are causing damage is disconcerting. It maybe only a few devices each year, but we’ve already heard about 90 cases where a Note 7 caught fire.

The Note 7 is having this recurring problem because it seems like Samsung has packed and squeezed the battery harder than they should have during the manufacturing process.  The pressure that was being placed was contained within the battery cells which in turn brought the positive and negative poles into contact.

“The defect was revealed when several contributing factors happened simultaneously, which included sub-optimized assembly process that created variations of tension and exposed electrodes due to insufficient insulation tape,” a Samsung representative tells the press.

How Long Does It Take Before Its Too Late?

According to Sadoway, the Note 7’s battery charges fast. Real fast. When charging the phone, it takes a little longer to fully charge the last few percentage so that the battery reaches full capacity.

Note 7 phones did not explode immediately. However, they seemed to have exploded when the phone was left charging overnight. Samsung is now looking to make the Note 7 safer by issuing a firmware update that will not let the phone charge more that 60% of its full capacity. Even then it’s not fool proof.

Reuters has reported that Samsung has already switched battery suppliers and the firmware update will also solve this problem. We are still awaiting further details about when the phone will be available to be sold again in the Indian sub-continent.

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